NolaAnarcha

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Mid-City Police Shootings: An Inevitable Result of the Apartheid Police State

A worker at a near by Burger King cries on the ground near where the New Orleans Police Department investigates the scene where two NOPD officers were shot and one suspect killed and another wounded on North Bernadotte near Toulouse Street early Thursday morning, March 1, 2012. According to restaurant employees, the slain suspect worked at the Burger King.
Early this morning, the police murdered another young black man in our community. His relatives say he and his brother who was also shot, were good young men. Both worked at Mid-City Burger King restaurants. Two police officers were also shot, presumably by the men they'd pulled over in a "proactive" traffic stop, i.e.- driving while black. This comes as no surprise, and is an inevitable result of the apartheid police state we live in.

Perhaps after being arrested and caged like animals several times at OPP only to have their charges later dropped the brothers vowed, like Truth Universal has, to never submit to NOPD taking them back to OPP on false pretenses yet again? It's very hard to climb out of the financial hole a false arrest can put a person in, especially on a Burger King salary. It's enough to make someone very angry, especially when they are pulled over mere blocks from their workplace.

No one knows exactly how or why 2 police officers and 2 young black men ended up shot this morning in Mid-City. But we do know that the NOPD arrests young black men at a rate that causes intense resentment in our community towards the cops. And we know that the NOPD shoots young black men dozens of times every year, making every encounter with law enforcement potentially deadly if you happen to be young and black.
Unsurprisingly, the corporate, police-guarded media has already begun defaming these young men's character, doing the indispensable job of slandering their lives that helps the NOPD make every police shooting seems justified. How else will the Times-Picayune get inside scoops and maintain friendly relationships with the police and those in power if they don't defend the NOPD's murderous actions? They are bringing up the victim's arrest records, even though they were not convicted. Such records are almost universal among young black men due to the nature of the Apartheid Police State we live in.

Pulled over for no reason on their way to work, these young men, already victims of the apartheid police state multiple times over by being locked up again and again while never convicted of any crime, no doubt felt targeted, harassed, and angry when they were pulled over for absolutely no reason this morning in Mid-City. One can only imagine their frustration and anger as the police made them late for work for a "pro-active traffic stop."

If people are angry that 2 police were shot, blame the system that pays them to harass, cage, and often to murder young black men in the streets, and engender the type of anger that could lead to such shootings. We have to get the NOPD to stop waging war on our fellow New Orleanians!
Jerome Simon, an uncle to the brothers, described his nephews as close knit and hard working. "They are home-body individuals. They go to work and come home, seriously. That’s a fact."
"They respect the law. I really, truly believe they won’t try to harm anybody," said Simon.
"They (NOPD) are supposed to be protecting around here, but they're not doing their job. 'Cause if they was, they would have all the ones they keep putting back out on the streets with these guns," said one of the victim's girlfriend. "It was a regular routine day...now all of the sudden this."
No tears for cops shot in an apartheid system. 
R.I.P. 20 year old New Orleanian Justin Sipp.

16 comments:

  1. While I agree with some points this a ridiculous piece.

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  2. If this were cleaned up a bit, i could read it on WTUL as an opinion piece.

    or would you mind if i edited it for style? it's a tad disjointed and repetitive as written...

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  3. that'd be amazing. please do. thank you. email me a copy of the edited version, maybe it'll help me edit this article for flow and cohesiveness.

    thanks!

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  4. This is nothing but hate. Who do you "presume" shot the two policemen, a squirrel? Your problem is you don't like the score.

    Remember to donate blood to the two officers shot in the line of duty. They're still fighting for their lives and should be kept in our prayers. I'm sure you'll join me in praying for them, Anarcha darlin.

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    1. Those who would pretend to care about the lives of police officers, like you, but continue to advocate for them putting themselves in harm's way, for actions that do nothing to improve public safety or welfare, are plain old hypocritical cowards too lazy to understand the causes and realities of crime and how to create a safe society. Instead, based on your own cowardly and ignorant emotional fear response to crime and lack of understanding about it's causes, consequences, and how other places make themselves much safer than we have, are willing to blindly call for others to put their lives at risk carrying out a mission that is ineffectual and motivated by politicians responses to the howls of fear of ignorant citizens like you. You are the one asking them to continue dying for nothing as long as you do not question whether their current objectives are useful or effective in making us all safer, and your crocodile tears cannot hide that fact.

      There are places on Earth much safer than New Orleans, for both civilians as well as the police officers who serve them, and if you actually cared about their lives, you'd learn about how those societies arrange themselves, and advocate for such changes here. I'll give you hint: we already have the largest, most advanced policing and prison system in the world, so those places that are safer haven't become so through the sheer brutal force of becoming a police state.

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    2. Thoughts from a dumb coonass:

      The horses around the quarter drop things with more honesty than this.

      Anarchy sounds great, but I think we should try the feudal system for a while too.

      There are no places "safe" on Earth as far as I know. The world has always been a dangerous place, sometimes it fools us into thinking otherwise.

      What is the plan for wiping out crime from the face of the world? Understand "crime"? This has been going on since the dawn of man. Here's how being robbed works: you have something of worth, they take it by force. Ever hear the old highwayman slogan "Your money or your life"? I'll bet criminal behavior is going to go on as long as there are people.

      You have to take the good with the bad. People in a free society need the freedom to be able to make bad choices, even if they're terrible ones. Until we have the technology to implant behavior modification chips into our brains or create drugs that completely dominate thinking, this will go on. There's no way that this will ever be a bad idea, right?

      They found out about the Danziger conspiracy, but somehow this one is going to successfully get swept under the rug like 9/11, eh?

      People become cops because they want to. The job is implied to be dangerous, I'm sure they know that beforehand.

      It is folly to rely on the police to be there or expect them to magically show up instantly at the first sign of trouble. Their job is to enforce the laws and keep the peace, not act as personal bodyguards.

      What and where are these better arranged societies you speak of? Does it cost a lot to go there? Hope not, because I'm broke.

      Let me know when you find out what's driving us wild.

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    3. Dear Mr. Coon Ass, Sir-
      Thanks for your comments. They are very interesting. Perhaps you'd be interested in checking out "Anarchy Works" by Peter Gelderloos to help answer some of your many questions.
      Specifically, perhaps the chapter on Crime from that book would answer many of the quite valid questions you are raising: Anarchy Works: Chapter 5 -- Crime
      If you have yet more questions, perhaps looking at the Anarchist FAQ would help you out.

      As to your specific comments:
      On the Feudal system: We have a system very similar to that right now in this city (for God's sake, the Mayor is the son of a former Mayor, and brother to a Senator). The transition from feudalism to mercantile capitalism was not an all-out victory, and that is especially true of the system we live under in this city. See: The Old Money Hierarchy and Luncheon Clubs Make Class Mutiny Easy! The people who have a vastly disproportionate amount of the wealth, both in our city, and generally in our country, are mostly the same elites who've been in power for hundreds of years. There may be more churn in the class of the top .01% nationally than locally, but it's essentially the case that very few people ever leave that bastion of American aristocracy once their family has entered it (our class mobility in the US is below that of Europe, and consider that some of those countries still have Kings and Queens!). (for more, see: Americans want to live in Sweden)

      You are correct that there are no truly safe places on Earth (even on your own desert island you can die from skin cancer due to overexposure to the sun, and we all die eventually, right?)... What is true, however, is that there are some places which have *relatively* more safety than other places, and that certain policies, ethics, and institutional arrangements can help create a relatively more or less safe place. The actions of the government and the wealthy elites, especially here, creates a place that is relatively LESS safe than other places. They are doing more harm than good in their short-sighted, backwards, knee-jerk, myopic, and authoritarian methods of trying to create safety largely through funding a massive prison-industrial-complex rather than tackling the root causes of crime such as social inequality, powerlessness, and wealth disparities. (for instance, it costs far less to pay for someone's college education at UNO for a year than to jail them for a year, but do we fund scholarships for at-risk youth or kids who go through Juvy so they can get into the legal economy? Nope). But then, to tackle the root causes, politicians would need to buck the will of the elites who fund their campaigns, and we all know it's the ones who write the checks that pull the puppet strings of politicians in this country.

      As far as better arranged societies goes, it depends what you want out of a society. Personally, I think the Scandanavian social democracies have a better balance of priorities than our country does. You can read more about it here. And if you want to look at a place that is not as rich as Scandanavia, you can read about Bhutan, which is an interesting example of a better arranged society. If you are interested in anarchist societies, check out information about the Spanish Civil War.

      Hope that answers some of your questions. Take care, Mr. coon ass, sir.

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  5. Many people do not believe the police's story and are asking questions about how Justin Sipp died. There is now information out about the histories of violence and abuse of the officers involved in this incident, all of whom were white:
    “Driving While Black” Stop in New Orleans Leaves Justin Sipp Dead, Brother Earl Wounded. Histories of violence by the officers involved is uncovered.

    Brother of man shot speaks out after NOPD murder

    Both victims and NOPD have a lot of explaining to do after justin sipp was killed by police

    JUSTIN SIPP DIED ON HIS FEET RATHER THAN LIVE ON HIS KNEES UNDER THIS UNJUST SYSTEM! R.I.P. TO A MARTYR IN THE FIGHT AGAINST POLICE ABUSE!

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  6. when this is the reality, things have just gone too far with these fucking cops (from ‘He Had This Fear of Calling the Police’:

    Pastor Raphael knows many of the neighborhood kids. He said one boy told him he had seen Summers laying there wounded hours before anyone called police.

    “He had this fear of calling the police. He wanted something to be done and he said he knew that kid and he just felt he couldn’t call the police that he wouldn’t be treated right or he would be considered a suspect if he called to report it, which a tragedy,” Raphael said.
    This reminds of something that happened to me a few years back. It was probably some time late in 2006. I was finishing up some work on the house in the front yard and was hosing off brushes. A kid who looked to be in middle school came up to me and asked me if I could walk him home. He seemed timid and frightened but I can’t tell you how many red flags went off in my head. I thought for sure I was being set up for something. I was somewhat new to the neighborhood and a neighbor I had at the time was constantly telling me how mad it was and how we were “urban pioneers” by even living there. I still thought critically about things but still, hearing things over and over again affects your sub-conscious to a degree. So my guard was up more than maybe it should have been.*
    I asked the kid a few questions. First, “why do I need to walk you home?”
    He said he was out after curfew and was afraid of the police. That seemed like a legit fear. I asked where he lived and he gave a decent enough answer, on Hendee a few blocks up and a few blocks over, probably 8 blocks total. I asked him where he was coming from and he said his grandmother’s house across the river. That seemed legit too. I asked how it was that he was out after curfew and he said the ferry was late. At that time the ferry schedule was pretty bad so that seemed to check out.
    My neighborhood isn’t too bad but it gets worse the closer one gets to Hendee. A few murders had happened there and it was a hot spot on the crime map. I didn’t want to walk this kid through there for my sake more than his. But he didn’t want to walk in the Point any more than he had to either.
    So I told him I’d drive him home. No go. He didn’t want to. I guess that was reasonable on his part because I could take him anywhere once he got in the car right?

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    1. What convinced me to go with him more than anything was he looked scared. Maybe scared of getting in trouble but mostly it seemed he was scared of the cops themselves.
      So we walked. All the way through the rest of the Point. We talked but I don’t remember about what. Some people hollered at us and we got some strange looks from everyone outside the Newton Market. At the corner of Whitney and Newton, I asked him how much further and he said he only lived a few blocks more and I asked him if it was okay to finish off the rest of the walk on his own. “Why?” he asked. “For the same reason you didn’t want to walk up to this spot, I don’t want to go any further. I’m scared.” This reply seemed to satisfy him.
      More in his own neighborhood and more comfortable it seems, he agreed to do the rest on his own and seemed in better spirits as he crossed the street on toward his block. His demeanor having altered greatly. He didn’t seem scared or vulnerable any more.
      I’ll never know if I was being set up for something or not. I’ll never know what would have happened if I had walked him all the way home or what may have happened on the way back alone. I believe nothing.
      Point is, this kid was scared of the cops and took a chance on a complete stranger rather than those sworn to serve and protect him. I only wish the kid in the story above had told a stranger about what he saw. I wish more that he felt comfortable going to the police.
      * That neighbor has since moved away. We had a falling out not long after and I stopped talking to him but those that do said he’s thinking about moving back to New Orleans. I am so happy the rest of us “pioneers” got the place back together for him just in time.

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    2. Another shooting:

      http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2012/03/new_orleans_police_shooting.html

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  7. Everyone come out tomorrow, Saturday, at 10am to the funeral and second line for martyr Justin Sipp at Majestic funeral home 1833 OC Haley Blvd. Everyone is invited and encouraged to bring signs or wear t-shirts memorializing Sipp and calling for an end to police murders.
    Do not miss this event!
    People are encouraged to bring a friend and have signs/shirts saying "I am Justin Sipp"...

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  8. Justin died on his feet rather than live on his knees in this APARTHEID POLICE STATE, this NEW JIM CROW.
    Justin Sipp is a hero and a martyr! Let's honor his memory!

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